Being Cautious This Summer Might Prevent Georgia Accidents

Do you think you are being as safe as possible this summer?

The National Safety Council sponsors National Safety Month each June. The annual observance to educate and influence behaviors around the leading causes of preventable injuries and deaths. They reason that the summer brings more people getting active and being outdoors, which in turn, brings more potential accidents.

NSC chooses each week in June to carry a theme that sheds light on safety issues. 2012’s weekly themes are employee wellness, ergonomics, preventing slip and falls, and driving safely.

Georgia accident lawyers at Kalka & Baer stress the importance of week 3 and week 4’s themes. Preventing slip and falls and safe driving are both a big safety concern for our nation. If you or someone you know has been involved in a slip and fall accident or car crash, contact Kalka & Baer right away.

Week 3: Preventing Slip and Falls
Most people associate falling with being clumsy or not paying attention. But, there are falls that are caused by risky factors…

  • Standing water
  • Ice, snow
  • Debris on the ground
  • Faulty railings


These things can be monitored properly, and when they are not, people can get seriously injured. Property managers are required by certain Georgia laws to maintain safe grounds and have their employees do the same. That can help prevent slip (or trip) and falls.

According to the NSC, Falls are by far the leading unintentional injury accounting for more than 8.7 million emergency room visits each year in the United States.

Week 4: Driving Safely
Driving safely has obviously been a topic we’ve covered in many of our blogs. As one of the most dangerous activities you will do each and every day, Georgia motorists need to be careful. Avoid distracted driving, improper seatbelt use, using a cell phone too much, impaired driving, and aggressive driving.

Did You Know?

  • NSC estimates almost 25% of crashes involve cell phone use while driving. (NSC Attributable Risk Estimate)
  • Research has shown that children are more likely to wear safety belts or use child safety seats when the parent (adult driver) buckles up.
  • Drivers and front seat passengers who buckle up are 45% more likely to survive motor vehicle crashes and 50% more likely to avoid serious injuries. (NHTSA)
  • In 2009, 32% of all fatalities in motor vehicle crashes involved a driver under the influence of alcohol. (NHTSA)
Categories: General