Cycling Across Georgia's Roadways

Cycling Across Georgia's Roadways

Bike LaneGeorgia is a great state for cycling. With its moderate climate, Georgia offers terrains from the beach to the mountain foothills. The state’s attractive pathways offer cyclists the opportunity to ride recreationally or for transportation.

  • Bicycle Ride Across Georgia (BRAG) is one of the larger cross-state rides in the nation and has seen about 2,000 participants each summer.
  • Tour de Georgia is a multi day race that draws in top tiers of cycling professionals from across the world.

Large races like these help promote a strong biking community. Georgia cities like Alpharetta, Marietta and Decatur are turning into up and coming cycling hot spots due to the growing popularity of recreational biking. Whether you are a beginner or experienced cyclist, you need to know the rules of the road (and bike pathways) before you begin each ride. The Georgia Department of Transportation (GDOT)works together with the state government to improve cycling conditions. GDOT’s manual- Georgia Bike Sense: A Guide for Cyclists & Motorists- is a great resource for safety information and the precautions Georgia cyclists need to take to follow the rules of the road.

Let’s take a look at some facts Georgia cyclists might not know…

Did you know? Everyone under the age of 16 who is operating or being a passenger on a bicycle must wear a helmet. Georgia law 40-6-296(e)(1) states that any rider under 16 on any road or pathway shall be required to wear a helmet.

Helmets are the most important piece of safety gear a cyclist can have. Wearing a helmet when riding reduces the chance of serious head injury by 85%. If you are in a bike crash and your helmet absorbs the crash impact, replace your helmet even if it does not appear damaged.

Did you know? Every Georgia cyclist should equip his/her bicycle with a light on the front when riding at nighttime. Georgia law 40-6-296(a) states that a light on the front of a bicycle should be a white light visible from a distance of 300 feet in front of the bike. Also, the bicycle should be equipped with a red reflector on the rear of the bike that is visible from behind from a distance of 300 feet.

Did you know? Any person proven to be an aggressive driver to a cyclist can be charged with a misdemeanor crime. Georgia law 40-6-397(a) states misdemeanor charges apply to those drivers of a high and aggravated manner.

According to the same law, the offense of aggressive driving is the intent of annoying, harassing, molesting, intimidating, injuring or obstructing another person.

As a Georgia cyclist, you should be aware of these rules and regulations for riding on the road and bike pathways. However, if you are injured in a bike accident, you can contact the Kalka & Baer law firm. As expert bicycle accident lawyers, we offer free consultations when you contact our office.

Categories: Cycling Accidents