Injuries in High- and Low-Velocity Accidents

Auto accidents can be described as low-velocity or high-velocity crashes. Although most people would probably assume that injuries don't occur as frequently in low-velocity crashes, they actually do. Even though low-velocity accidents happen below 10 miles per hour, a victim's body can be thrown around in the car and suffer injuries in the impact. In fact, these types of accidents typically throw a victim backwards and forwards in a rapid motion, often producing such injuries as:

  • Whiplash
  • Seatbelt bruises
  • Muscle strain
  • Neck and back injuries
  • Head trauma

Just because the impact isn't as violent as in a high-velocity collision doesn't mean that damage isn't done. Car accidents, even at 10 mph, can cause serious injuries to Georgia motorists.

Low-Velocity Collisions vs. High-Velocity Accidents

High-velocity crashes in Georgia are typically defined as anything above 10 mph. In these types of accidents, more serious injuries are often sustained because the victim generally hits an object inside the vehicle, such as the steering wheel or dashboard.

Injuries can include the following:

  • Neck sprains
  • Concussions
  • Knee pain and hematomas
  • Headaches and head hematomas
  • Shoulder pain
  • Numbness and tingling in arms or legs from nerve damage
  • Wrist fractures
  • Traumatic brain injury
  • Spinal cord injury
  • Paralysis

Many times, victims of both high-velocity and low-velocity crashes do not know how badly they are injured immediately following the accident. This is especially true in low-velocity accidents, as symptoms do not tend to immediately surface. Therefore, it is critical that victims of car accidents seek medical treatment as soon as possible after a crash.